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Spotting Scopes

Spotting Scopes

A spotting scope is a telescope with a large objective lens which produces a bright, upright image of great clarity and detail. They are very popular for bird watchers and other naturalist activities. It’s essential that a tripod is used with a spotting scope because of their large magnification. Some scopes can be used both as a visual instrument and as photographic instrument. With appropriate adapters, scopes from certain manufacturers, such as Olivon, Visionary, and Praktica ranges, can serve as telephoto lenses for SLR cameras. The Visionary V-100A 25-75x100 is perfect for this with its range of magnification and high quality lenses.

Digiscoping is the art of attaching a digital camera to a spotting scope to create powerful telephoto pictures. It is perfect for wildlife photography, especially bird watching. Digiscoping allows you use the powerful zoom of your spotting scope, coupled with the ease of use and convenience of your digital camera. This enables you to zoom into your chosen subject and capture amazing images of wildlife, without having to get too close and risk disturbing your subject matter. All at the fraction of the cost of using an SLR camera with a large telephoto lens.

The Praktica 15-45x60 Digiscoping Kit contains everything you need to enter the wonderful world of super telephoto imaging. This Praktica outfit not only allows the user to take high quality telephoto still images, but they can also shoot in 720HD video enabling the user to capture movies when the subject is at long range - perfect for wildlife, astronomy, sport, marine and other outdoor activities! Often associated with high end, expensive optical equipment, Praktica now brings digiscoping to a wider audience with this affordable outfit.

 

Straight Scopes versus Angled Scopes

How the eye piece fits to the scope body gives rise to their description as either straight scopes or angled scopes. The straight eye piece variety are common, and often easier to use, because the eye piece is in line with the body of the scope and pointing in the direction that you are looking. Straight scopes are best suited for observing birds that are at, or below, eye level. The angled eye pieces are fitted at 45° to the body, and if the body is rotated it can become disorientating, though with practice this becomes less of a problem. Angled scopes are best suited to observing birds that are high up, for example in trees or in flight. If you are going to use a tripod, then the tripod will be lower and more stable with an angled scope (because you are looking downwards in to the eye piece) than with a straight scope.

The size of the objective lens influences the clarity of the image. The bigger the lens, the more light is gathered and the better the image, but also the heavier and bulkier the scope, which should be an important consideration on field trips. Common objective lens diameters are: 50 mm, 60 mm, 66 mm, 77 mm, 80 mm and 85 mm.

The eye piece sets the magnification. As with binoculars, a high magnification is not necessarily the best, because high magnification decreases the field of view, which makes targeting more difficult, decreases image brightness, effects steadiness, and heat haze can become a problem. Common magnifications range from 25x to 32x.

Our most popular spotting scope - the Olivon T64, is of high quality, and is perfectly suited for digiscoping. This spotting scope is ready to accept the Olivon digiscope adapters at a great value price. Asthetically, the new T64 looks fantastic, and looks like a scope that should have cost a lot more than it has. The Olivon T64 is also very tough as it has a rubber coated body, is nitrogen filled, and also fully waterproof.